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Partnership to deliver better health results for Indigenous Australians

The first meeting of the Western NSW Primary Health Network (WNSWPHN) Aboriginal Health Council will be held to inform of strategy for improving the health of Aboriginal people in the region.A UNIQUE new partnership, established to deliver better health outcomes for Aboriginal people in the western parts of NSW, will be launched on Thursday.
Nanjing Night Net

The first meeting of the Western NSW Primary Health Network (WNSWPHN)’s Aboriginal Health Councilwill be held to inform of strategy for improving the health of Aboriginal people in the region.

Of the 31 Primary Health Networks (PHN) in Australia, Western NSW is the only one that has an Aboriginal Health Council, meaning it is a trailblazer as far as the commitment to Indigenous health is concerned.

William ‘Smiley’ Johnstone has taken on the role of chair for the council.

He is positive that it marks the start of a unique partnership to address the important primary health care needs of Aboriginal people in the region.

“The council consists of nine members that will support and advise the WNSWPHN board of directors and staff on understanding locally relevant Aboriginal community perspectives, their unique health needs, access issues and service gaps,” he said.

“Aboriginal community engagement is vital to achieving an improved patient journey and better health outcomes for Aboriginal people.”

Dr Tim Smyth, chair of the Western Health Alliance Ltd board (which operates WNSWPHN) described how the Aboriginal Health Council was established,

“While forming the Western NSW Primary Health Network in 2015 there was a watershed moment, where partners realised that resolving poor Aboriginal health outcomes would require a new level of commitment, partnership and participation of Aboriginal people in the development of health care to meet their needs,” he said.

“The board of directors are committed to a genuine process of engagement with existing Aboriginal networks and individuals, including Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS), which results in improved patient outcomes and health service improvements.”

The Aboriginal Health Council will meet four times per year and reports to the WNSWPHN board of directors.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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